Thursday, April 13, 2006

Potluck List for Poetry Reading

Hey Guys!

Here is the list of stuff everyone is bring to the final reading on May 4th. If you didn't sign up or you aren't sure what you want to bring, you may want to think about bringing soda or water (we're all going to be hot and dry-mouthed from nerves!)

1. Merissa - Banana Split Cake
2. Kristyn H. - Vegetarian Taco Dip
3. Melissa - Chocolate Chip Cookies
4. Rita - Brownies
5. Cheryl - Cheese and Pepperoni
6. Amanda - Oreo Cookie Pie
7. Crystal - Ziti Casserole
8. Nicole - Garbage Bread
9. Erica - Chips and Salsa
10. Amie - Soda and Cups
11. Kristin T. - Cupcakes
12. Aliya - Cheese Dip
13. Canaan - Guacamole
14. Patty - Bread Dip
15. James - Drinks
16. Amber - Fruit and Fruit Dip

Banana Hammock Handwasher

Tip Toast hard nut crack. Black

Iguana Moon & the Banana Hammocks Ben Harper Meat Puppets

Tupac, Chopin, Princess Consuela Banana

Hammock Fast Eddie; Costa Rica- tail monkey's

presence Rapid Request Relaxin' Camarillo Monkey Banana

Request this song ...The Social Music

Revolution and Miles Davis

Lying in Joller's hammock stifling

Dear Catstrophe nutjob Melt-Banana

Craigslist leather is sticking mightily

to my banana hammock and chafing my

died of a massive coronary. ...

championhandwasher.blogspot.com

Steve's Zone of Love...

I rubbed my hand against Charlie's face on the jukebox. ...

Jazz At Massey Hall Similar Bobby Woodlen --

Trumpet; OnlineElephantman -- April In Paris


--the class Flarf poem

Hwk for Thursday 4/20

Bring a printed out copy of an original poem on anything

guidelines for Poem:

-10 lines
-number of words per line in this order:
3
2
3
2
4
7
2
3
2
3

Close reading: William Carlos Williams' "To Elsie."



To make two bold statements: There's nothing sentimental about a machine, and: A poem is a small (or large) machine made out of words. When I say there's nothing sentimental about a poem, I mean that there can be no part that is redundant.--William Carlos Williams

The Academy of American Poets has a link to Williams reading this poem here.

Franz Wright resources.



Poetry:
Poem: "When You See Fame Coming Run"
Poem: "Empty Stage"
From Poetry Daily: "Woods Hole Ferry."
Three poems on the journal Slope.
Four poems on Typo Magazine.

Prose:
An essay about Wright in BoldType by Ernest Hilbert.
Entry at the Academy of American Poets website (with other links on the left-hand column).
A piece on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition.
Another radio piece on NPR's The Connection.
Jordan Davis reviews one of his books, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Walking to Martha's Vineyard, at Constant Critic.
Some Wright-related controversies brewing here and here.

Sunday, April 09, 2006

This is poetry.

Somewhere I love to go is to the beach.

I love to go to Saugerties because I get to go for a walk in the woods.

Somewhere I love to go at the end of the day is home to where my loved ones are.

Somewhere I love to go is to the mall.

I love to go to Rochester because you are there.

Somewhere I love to go is the beach.

I hate to go to my urologist because he sticks his finder in places that make me dizzy.

I love to go to CPMS because I get to see Paris.

Somewhere I go every day is to the bathroom.

Somewhere I go every day is deep in thought.

I love to go to Ocean City MD because that is where I'm going to move and start my life.

I love to go to the mall because it's my time for me.

I hate to go to the dentist. He always tells me there's something wrong. Now I'm going to lose my wisdom teeth and it's all I can think about. I think my teeth are FINE!

Somewhere I love to go is to sleep because it is in my dreams that the world is all mine.

I love to go to Wildwood, NJ with my family.

Somewhere I hate to go is the basement of my apartment building.

I hate to go for long drives in the car.

I love to go to the beach because you can relax and soak up all the rays you want.

I love to go tanning because it relaxes me.

I love to go to work because I get to spend time with my kids!

I loved to go to sleep with my thumb in my mouth, the cold sheet safely between my fingers. The boogie man could never get me here. And my mom would kiss me goodnight. Warning me I was getting too old to suck my thumb.

--Class poem written in-class following Kristyn H's writing prompts, April 6.

Sunday, April 02, 2006

Homework for April 6.

There is no audioblogging to do this week besides the extra credit opportunity of covering Todd Colby's "Cake." (Details here.)

Here's what you need to do for this Thursday:

1. Bring a dictionary,
any English print dictionary, and copies of your poems to the next class. I'll tell you why on Thursday.

2. Write an informal but focused 2-3 page paper and present it to the class.
It's time to put into words your ideas surrounding the topic of our class and its concentration--the oral interpretation of literature as it relates to the performance of poems. I have provided some handy writing prompts at the end of this assignment that should be helpful for some of you.

The assignment. Outline your reaction to any of the following:

-- your audioblogging Joanna Fuhrman and Drew Gardner poems;
-- your meeting and seeing the poets in-person (however briefly);
-- your experience as you watched or participated in the Poetics Orchestra demonstration; and finally,
-- the reading and performance itself.

Do not write about each and every one of these events--it's only a 2-3 page paper, after all. Limit yourself to one, maybe two of those items, and relate them to an idea or notion of your own practice of reading and performing poems in this class. I should be able to pinpoint a sentence in which you outline your own idea.

Integrate two of the following really short pieces of writing into your paper:

Do not just summarize the reading, although you can do that; try to relate or integrate an idea from these readings with one of your own in the same sentence:

-- This short excerpt from Charles Olsen's essay "Projective Verse";
-- This definition of Flarf, which is a movement or school of poetry to which Drew Gardner belongs;
-- This short excerpt from Frank O'Hara's "Personism: A Manifesto," a primary text of The New York School of Poetry, a tradition of poetry to which Joanna Fuhrman belongs.

Here's some writing prompts that might help you begin five of your paragraphs:

Some of my students in other classes like to have writing prompts to get their thoughts going in a paper. I know do! Change the language below to fit your own needs; the way these prompts are arranged sort of forces you to introduce a notion or idea, question yourself, test it out, explore it, and try another way of expressing it--that is, writing a true "essay." Here are the prompts:

  1. "When I think about how I writer and read aloud my own poems, one [pick: notion or idea] that stands out for me when I write this is ... "
  2. "To be sure, when I saw and heard [pick one: Drew Gardner or Joanna Fuhrman] read [his or her] poems last Thursday, I ...."
  3. "One way to look at it is how [discuss a reading here and relate to your own notion or idea] ..."
  4. "What do we mean by " ... " anyway?"
  5. "In the end, maybe I should change my [notion or idea] slightly. Maybe ..."

For your 5-10 minute oral presentation, you will not be reading the paper to the class. Rather, you will present and expand on the ideas explored in your paper. Be prepared to field questions from your classmates--I will be calling on students to ask questions. You can conduct a short workshop, offer handouts, use the projection screen, read a poem, address a topic you are still wrestling with; in short, teach the class something you have learned thus far in the semester, or something you would like to learn more about, and use the class to make learning happen.

You will be graded on the presentation and the paper.

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Crystal R. reads Drew Gardner's "Watch Crystal Ludicrous Practice"

this is an audio post - click to play

Crystal R. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Metropolis Moraine"

this is an audio post - click to play

Canaan B. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Brooklyn Efficiency Apartment Moraine"

this is an audio post - click to play

Canaan B. reads Drew Gardner's "I Am Myself Today"

this is an audio post - click to play

Stephanie A. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Moraine for Bob"

this is an audio post - click to play

Stephanie A. reads Drew Gardner's "I Am So Stupid"

this is an audio post - click to play

Erica L. reads Todd Colby's "Cake" (for extra credit)

this is an audio post - click to play

Erica L~ Todd Coldy's "Cake"

Erica L~ Todd Coldy's "Cake"

Marina V. reads Drew Gardner's "Milk Crate"

this is an audio post - click to play

Kristin T. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "In The Basement of The Museum of Potential Urges"

this is an audio post - click to play

Marina V. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "In The Basement of The Museum of Potential Urges"

this is an audio post - click to play

Kristin T. reads Drew Garnder's "Don't Open"

this is an audio post - click to play

Erica L. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "In The Basement of The Museum of Potential Urges"

this is an audio post - click to play

Erica L. reads Drew Gardner's "Do Not Open"

this is an audio post - click to play

Kristyn H. reads Drew Gardner's "Elk Situationist Fad"

this is an audio post - click to play

Kristyn H. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Moraine for Bob"

this is an audio post - click to play

Amanda R. reads Drew Gardner's "Don't Open"

this is an audio post - click to play

Amanda R. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Metropolis Moraine"

this is an audio post - click to play

Monday, March 27, 2006

Merissa S. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Mellow Pad Moraine"

this is an audio post - click to play

Merissa S. reads Drew Gardner's "Don't Open"

this is an audio post - click to play

Jessica S. reads Drew Gardner's "I Am So Stupid"

this is an audio post - click to play

Jessica S. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "In The Basement of The Museum of Potential Urges"

this is an audio post - click to play

Melissa S. reads Joanna Fuhrman's "Moraine for Bob"

this is an audio post - click to play

Melissa S. reads Drew Gardner's "Bells"

this is an audio post - click to play

Extra credit opportunity: Record Todd Colby's "Cake"

This opportunity entails you recording a cover version of a poem by Todd Colby. You might recall he recorded a version of William Blake's "Ah! Sunflower" for our class in January.

Go to the following website and follow all the directions.

Basically, people are doing the same thing we're doing in class--recording their own readings of someone's poem. Some are taking liberties--there's a death metal version that's pretty terrific.

Record the poem on our own Class Blog and use your audioblog's post specific web address to tell the radio station you have done it.

What I mean by specific post address?
It's the difference between the following.
Kristyn audioblogged Susan Brennan's "Afternoon Bomb." Here is the specific post address, otherwise known as the "permanent link."

How did I get this? I got this by clickling on the time and date at the bottom of the post. See this picture. When you find your audioblog post--I'll put the title on it, don't worry about that--use that address and send it along to the WFMU DJ from the webstite. This is fun, eh?

Any questions, email me.

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